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THE HARRIERS HERALD

No. 170, April 2007

Editor: Sue Francis

 

In brief

·         Thursday night schedules for April and May

·         Correspondence received in March

·         Registration with England Athletics

·         Details of Road Running Leadership Group

·         Details of IAH-Compton Relay

 

·         Thanks to Sue P, Mo, Lucy, Pete, Martin and Sus for their contributions this month

·         Copy date for May’s Harriers Herald:  2nd May

 

Features and reports

·         Sue P enjoys a duathlon in New Zealand

·         Sus and Pete battle with the elements at Silverstone

·         A P.B. for Ryan in the Reading Half

·         Eleventh place for Martin in the Combe Gibbet to Overton race

·         Lucy and Martin wuther round the moors

·         Race results in brief: PBs and top placings at Barcelona, Bath, Woburn and Banbury

·         Rich wins the monthly Handicap Race, but Kev still leads the championship

·         Website Update - Mo features health and nutrition for distance runners

·         Events Diary – Mo’s choice of races from April to October

 

  

Thursday night schedule for April

Thurs    5th        Lucy to lead

Thurs    12th       Handicap Race

Thurs    19th       Tom to lead

Thurs    26th       Pete to lead

 

Thursday night schedule for May

Thurs    3rd        Freya to lead

Thurs    10th         IAH Relay

Thurs    17th       Ryan to lead

Thurs    24th       Martin to lead

Thurs    31st       Kev to lead

 

Correspondence received

Sender

Subject matter

Action

SEAA

Certificate confirming our affiliation (01-01-07 to 31-03-08); Info. update #106

File

England Athletics

Road Running forum (Eton, 28-04-07) – each club can send one representative

Anyone interested?

England Athletics

Final notice of forthcoming AGM

File

Chinnor Christian Aid

Icknield Way Half & 10K (12-05-07)

Events Diary & notice board

England Athletics

Affiliation guidelines & forms

Completed & ready to post off – thanks Lucy & Pete

UK Athletics

Annual review (3 copies)

Passed round

UK Athletics

Warning about a dodgy coach (David Farrow)

File

St. Catherine’s Hospice

Crawley 10K (multi-terrain) (15-07-07)

Events Diary & notice board

Flora London Marathon

Information on Road Running Leadership Group

See below


Registration with England Athletics

Sue

Thanks to assistance from Lucy and Pete, I am now virtually ready to send off our affiliation forms and fees.

Club affiliation  The annual fee is £50, and we have had to provide the following information: Name and contact details of Secretary (me) and Membership Secretary (Lucy), disciplines to which our club wishes to affiliate, our club vest colours.

Individual affiliation  The annual fee is £3 for each competing first claim athlete.  Of our 15 paid-up first claim club members, all except Kirsty wished to be registered with England Athletics as competing athletes (Colin and I are second claim members, so will pay our £3 competition fees via our respective first claim clubs).  We have had to provide the following information on every club member: name, gender, date of birth, address, date of joining Compton Harriers, first or second claim member, ‘competing athlete’ or ‘social athlete’.  We declined to provide the optional information (phone nos., e-mail addresses, ethnic origin).  The information has been submitted via an Excel spreadsheet, completed by Lucy, using the information you provided on your club membership forms.

England Athletics will issue all members of the club with an England Athletics membership card.  The membership card will act as a competition license only for those who are registered as competing athletes.  These cards will be sent individually to members at their home addresses, along with a data protection clearance form.   England Athletics plan to do all this by September.

 

 

Road Running Leadership Group (RRLG)

Summary of the letter received from The Flora London Marathon

 

The RRLG has been set up by UK Athletics, following significant concerns raised by some leading UK road races (Reading Half, London Marathon, Great North Run etc.) that the future of road running seemed to have been marginalised during the restructuring of athletics in the UK.  Concerns included ‘permits’, ‘standards of safety’ and spending of ‘unattached levies’ (RRLG believes these funds should go to support road running).  The RRLG includes race organisers, as well as UKA representatives.  The Flora London Marathon strongly supports the RRLG.

 

The RRLG will address many of the issues raised by The Association of Running Clubs (which has been established as an alternative affiliation body by a group of people who oppose UK Athletics).

The Flora London Marathon Chief Executive says “We recognise that UK Athletics is the legitimate governing body of our sport and is recognised by the international federation (IAAF) in that position.  Only races permitted by UK Athletics are recognised by the IAAF as properly constituted races.  We therefore do not support any attempt to split the sport.  We wish to make it clear that, in future, Club and Championship Entries to The Flora London Marathon will only be made to Clubs and Runners affiliated to UK Athletics”.

  

IAH-Compton Relay Race 2007

Sue

 

The Institute’s Annual Relay, contested by teams of four, will be held on Thursday 10th May, starting at 5:30 pm from the cricket field.  Each stage (1.6 miles, or 2530 metres) will start and finish in the cricket field.

The Relay is open to those employed on the Compton site, and to other IAH Recreation Association members; in each team, at least two members should be employees and/or other Rec. Soc. members, but up to two team members may be relatives, friends or other guests, should you be struggling to make up a foursome. 

As in previous years, there will be start time advantages depending on the number of ladies and veterans in a team.  This year, in response to a few requests, I am thinking of introducing an additional (favourable) handicap, perhaps 30 seconds, for veterans over the age of 50 – to be confirmed!

The bar will be open and the barbecue burning, and Rec. Soc. will again be giving a Pickled Pig drink voucher to each competitor and helper.

Teams should be entered by 4th May at the latest (by e-mail to sue.baigent@bbsrc.ac.uk); there is no entry fee.

 

Christchurch (NZ) Ladies Duathlon, 28th January

Sue P

 

Having been in NZ for almost 9 months, I thought it was about time that I entered a sporting event to encourage me to get on with some proper training again.  One lazy afternoon, sipping cold, fizzy beer in a pub in Christchurch, I saw an advert for the New Zealand ladies duathlon series, and thought that it might be a good opportunity to try something new.  Since the move to Oxford, it meant a very early start to travel into Christchurch on race day, drop the bike off at transition and be ready for the 7:30 am warm-up.  When the alarm went off at 5:30 am, I did question whether I really was keen enough to do this, especially as my training for the event had consisted of just a few very short runs and a few social bike rides.

 

Arriving at McCleans island equestrian centre, I was rewarded with the amazing sight of over 700 bikes racked up and the most glorious sunrise meaning we would be in for a beautifully warm summer day (sorry – I know you will be reading this in winter!).

 

The event, one of a series of 10 throughout NZ, was totally non-competitive and simply a drive to get women fit and active (a bit like the Race for Life series).  The event was so well organised around a relatively flat course of 3.5K run, 10K bike and 1.5K run with people being set off in waves of 50 every 2 minutes.  I was in wave 5, and to my delight had passed about 100 women by the end of the first run!  I was on a roll and sprinted into transition, hopped on my mountain bike and with adrenalin-surged legs overtook more people on the flat road section.  Another wobbly-legged run to transition and more people overtaken during the final run to the line with an overall time of 59:03 and 153rd place.  Not brilliant I know, but I was extremely pleased with myself and have already entered another event at the beginning of March – this time I will try to do some training!

 

The great thing about the event was the spot prizes, which were a real incentive to stay to the end: road racing bikes; 1 years supply of milk; 1 year’s supply of breakfast cereal; sportswear etc etc.  Not what you would call a ‘local’ event, but one I would certainly recommend if anyone is thinking about coming to NZ for a holiday next year.

 

 

Silverstone and Reading Half Marathons

 

Pete and Sus share their experiences of the Silverstone and Reading Half Marathons

  

Silverstone Half Marathon, 18th March

 

Pete

 

The dramatic weather on the day provided a far greater challenge than that of running 13.1 miles.  Gale force winds, driving sleet and hailstones provided a true test for competitors.  The hailstones pelting my face at least took away any thoughts about my legs feeling weary in the closing stages. In fact it was so cold waiting for the start that Sus bought tracksuit bottoms to keep warm.

 

The race was won by Hendrick Ramaala, a previous winner of the New York Marathon, in 66:53 minutes.  This relatively slow time for a top athlete amply demonstrated the difficult conditions in which tailwinds seemed insignificant compared with the strong headwinds experienced on the exposed course.  On the positive side it was very flat.

 

The course twisted and turned around virtually every stretch of tarmac at the motor circuit and proved to be very disorientating and not just for competitors.  A rabbit became "trapped" amongst the contraflow of runners at one point and sped off in all directions in search of safe cover.  It certainly moved faster than the celebrity starter Nigel Mansell.

 

I finished in 1:42:32 behind Sus in 1:37:37.  I was given a finishing position of 1,049th overall and 54th in my age group.  The press release states over 6,000 runners took part, but the website does not give an exact number.  Whilst the medal was basically a glorified advert for the sponsor it did at least have the correct year engraved on it.

 

Anyone thinking of entering next year should get there early.  It took an hour to drive to within 2 miles of the circuit but a further 40 minutes to complete the journey - and even then I had to unsportingly cut into the inside lane at the last possible moment to ensure I had almost 5 minutes to spare at the start. My warm up consisted of running most of the 3/4 miles from the car park to the start.

 

Of the fancy dress competitors my favourite was three white guys who blacked up their skin, donned dreadlocks and multicoloured woolen hats whilst connecting themselves together inside a plastic frame. If you haven't already guessed, they were the Jamaican bobsleigh team.

 

 Sus

 

On the Thursday before the race, I told Pete that one of the reasons to enter the Silverstone was that it is an excellent chance to make a PB providing we had no wind – and what did we have – gale force winds, with driving sleet and snow, but we did also get glorious sun.  I lost track of my timekeeping because the mile markers with the gun time had  blown away and the pace keeper could not hold on to his lollipop.  So I thought, what the heck just go for it but do not worry about the time.  Though the route is very exposed I still like this race because everything goes like clockwork.

 

Sus                               1:37:37

Pete                             1:42:32

Elo                               2:49:31

Nigel Mansell               2:53:32

 

 Reading Half Marathon, 25th March

 

Pete

 

Another week, another half marathon!  By way of contrast to Silverstone, conditions were near ideal with no wind, no rain and a moderate temperature.  The start was akin to the London Marathon - it took almost 1 minute 30 seconds to reach the start line and for the first quarter mile it was not possible to go above jogging pace due to the volume of runners.  The only significant hills were encountered within the first couple of miles after which the course was fairly flat with a healthy size turnout from the locals to give encouragement.

 

I caught up with Gill Harrison at the 6-mile point but lost contact 1.5 miles later when I slowed down to visit a drink station.  The race's unique selling point is the finish in the Madejski Stadium.  Running out of the tunnel onto the pitch cheered on by some 5,000 spectators gave me a welcome boost and despite a sprint finish I actually felt better at the end of the race than I did at the start!

 

I was suffering with a heavy cold and was thus pleased to have completed the course a couple of minutes faster than the previous week in a chip time of 1:40:04 (gun time 1:41:16) whilst Susanne achieved 1:36:02.  Only 4 minutes apart but 650 places separated us with our chip positions being 1835th and 1185th.  Ryan finished in 1:26:09 but I was unable to find his exact details on the website - the technology unable to keep pace with him!  Simon Kasimili headed the 9,877 finishers in a time of 1:03:36 whilst Louise Damen, running the distance for the first time, set a course record of 1:10:47 in the women's race.

 

 

Sus

 

First time I did it, would definitively (providing you leave early from home) recommend it, because the finish at the Madejski stadium was awesome - you felt like some important football player.  So yes, my entry is definitely in next year despite the high entry price.

 

Ryan     1:26:09 (PB)

Sus            1:36:02

Pete          1:40:02

  

 

The 33rd Combe Gibbet to Overton Race, 1st April

Martin

 

The Combe Gibbet to Overton is a 16-mile linear trail race which starts at the gibbet on Gallows Down, near Inkpen and leads the runners to the recreation ground in Overton, Hampshire.  The coach ride from Overton to the gibbet was included in the modest, £8.00 entry fee.  And as coach rides go I would give it 10 out of 10 for scenic splendour.  On leaving the coach, a Welshman was heard to comment ‘Ah, countryside for beginners’ and who can argue with that?

 

The course followed the Wayfarer’s Walk to Sydmonton and then turned South towards Overton, just before Watership Down.  You could just hear Bright Eyes being sung softly in the distance.  No rabbits though, I guess they had all been gassed.

 

In essence, the route followed a chalk ridge, which offered fantastic views of the Berkshire/Hampshire Downs and was essentially down hill.  Starting at 280m, by the gibbet and finishing at 90m by the timekeepers clip board.  Nevertheless, we did assail the highest chalk hill in the country (Walbury Hill, 297m) a few miles before burrowing under the A34 (125m).  The whole event was extremely well organised and the course was a delight to run, despite the strong North Easterly wind.

 

All organised by the Overton Harriers and Athletic Club www.overtonharriers.org.uk who get top marks.

 

The abridged results are:

 

First man:                     ~ 1:37

First lady:                     ~ 2:01

Martin:                         1:54 (11th)

Lucy:                            2:30 (mid-field)

Number of finishers:      ~4 x coaches’ worth


Wuthering Hike (Haworth Hobble): Grizzly or just grim?

Lucy

 

On Saturday 10th of March we had intended to board the Harriers’ charabanc to Devon, but circumstances (and an Italian ship full of motorbikes) meant the Grizzly was postponed and we had a weekend to spare.  What better than to run the first race of the Montrail series in Yorkshire, combined with a trip to visit Martin’s relatives?  Since it also meant I could legitimately buy a new map, the decision was made.

 

The race started at a bunkhouse on the edges of some grim-looking moors.  The weather was likewise grim, and (due to a recent cold) I was feeling somewhat grim.  On the plus side Martin felt fine, and very kindly jogged around the 31-mile route with me, admiring the numerous reservoirs and only giving in to the occasional urge to run up the hills at top speed.

 

The route of the Hike described an anticlockwise loop of the moors from Haworth to Worsthorne moor, past Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and back up to the start past Oxenhope.  There were a few longish hills to climb but, since reservoirs (about 4 of them) were also on the itinerary, the route was surprisingly flat.

 

There was a checkpoint every 7-or so miles, with broken biscuits from a big catering box prominently on the menu.  At Mankinholes at 19 miles there were also buns and a big urn full of tea, ready milked. My heroes!  The hill after that – Stoodly Pike - must have been the steepest, because some local worthy with a grim, industrial taste in monuments had added to its majesty with a great big pointy-looking one.  After scaling the pike our work appeared to be done.  The final chapter began with the descent into Hebden Bridge, a climb up the other side and a gentle plummet to the Crimsworth brook.  After some more Yorkshire hospitality at Horse Bridge it was up into the moors again for one last time, to ‘Top o’ stairs’, then some downhill and another reservoir before the - frankly rather cruel - half-mile up the tarmac road to the finish in the bunkhouse.

 

As soon as we checked in we joined the soup queue and were soon replacing our lost electrolytes.  All traces of my cold vanished and with a bunkhouse shower and a local beer even the wuthering seemed to die down; the sun came out slightly and I saw the ‘heights in a warm, roseate glow.  We finished the course in 5:57; the winner, Adam Breaks did it in 3:43:24 and the first ladies, Helene Whitaker and Cath Worth (a team of 2) made it in 4:53:24.  This was a great route with fine hospitality laid on so I might just do it again next year – unless there’s something equally grim going on down South!

 

 

Other race results in brief………

 

The Barcelona Marathon ~ Rich finished in an excellent 3:45, with Matt crossing the line around the 5 hour mark.

 

The Woburn 10K ~ Kev set a P.B., running sub-50 for the first time.

 

The Bath Half Marathon ~ Lucy ran 1:41, also a personal best performance.

 

The final race of the Oxford Mail cross-country league ~ held at Drayton School, Banbury.  It was windy, rained all day and there was a long stretch of shin-deep water along the disused railway line section.  Sue finished 13th in the ladies race, thereby securing the position of fourth veteran lady in the 5-race series.


Handicap Race

 

Twelve runners turned up for March’s handicap race, to put Jan’s time-keeping skills to the test.  Still on a high from his recent good performance at the Barcelona Marathon, Rich had an excellent run and knocked a minute off his handicap race P.B. to record a very respectable time (Sus says he’s been running much better since he got some new running tights).  Kirsty recorded her best time for over a year to take second spot, while an improved run by Pete saw him rewarded with third place.  Freya knocked over 20 seconds off her February time to finish fourth.  Although Mo was last to cross the finish line, he would have marginally beaten Rich, had he set off at his correct start time (not my fault this time; in an act of great chivalry, Mo offered to start with a reduced lead so the rest of us wouldn’t have to wait too long in the cold).  Mo’s time was his best for over a year.  He wanted Rich to get the 7 points for his good effort, but I’ve awarded Mo the 6 points.

Well done to Rich, and thanks to Jan again for successfully timing so many of us.  The next Handicap Race is scheduled for Thursday 12th April.

 

In the Handicap Championship, Kev retains his position at the top, but Pete is now only one point behind Kev!

 

Pos

Name

Start time

Finish time

Actual time

Handicap Beaten?

1

Rich

2:40

14:59

12:19

-1:01

2

Kirsty

0:14

15:22

15:08

-0:38

3

Pete

2:46

15:36

12:50

-0:24

4

Freya

3:01

15:39

12:38

-0:21

5

Sue

3:46

15:53

12:07

-0:07

6

Lucy

2:26

15:57

13:31

-0:03

7

Sus

3:06

16:05

12:59

+0:05

8

Dick

3:30

16:09

12:39

+0:09

9

Andy

4:19

16:25

12:06

+0:25

10

Martin

4:52

16:27

11:35

+0:27

11

Kev

2:35

16:58

14:23

+0:58

12

Mo

0:14

18:58

18:44

-1:04

 

 Pos.

Name

Race points

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Total

1

Kev

7

6

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

2

Pete

5

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

3

Sue

4

5

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

4=

Ryan

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

4=

Rich

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

4=

Lucy

6

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

7

Mo

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

8

Kirsty

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

9=

Martin

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

9=

Freya

-

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

11=

Matt

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

11=

Susanne

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

13=

Andy

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

13=

Dick

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

13=

Tom

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

  

 

Website update… http://www.comptonharriers.org.uk

Mo

 

For those of you who are planning longer runs such as the London Marathon (22nd April), how about a few Dos and Don’ts on race nutrition … what you eat and drink in the days and weeks leading up to an event, especially one of marathon distance or longer, is as critical a part of your preparation as your training.  Get it right and you could have the best chance of knocking out a PB, get it wrong and you could find yourself grinding to a halt!

 

Do step up your calorie intake. Whenever you increase your weekly mileage or training tempo, you'll need to match your calorie intake to your output. If your legs feel heavy all the time and you're struggling to complete your training programme, increase your carbohydrate intake: an extra portion of potatoes, pasta or breakfast cereal can make a big difference to muscle glycogen levels.

Do eat two to four hours before training. Good choices include porridge, cereal with milk, a chicken or cheese sandwich, a jacket potato with beans and pasta with tuna. Failing that, have an apple, a few dried apricots, a handful of sultanas or a pot of yoghurt half an hour beforehand, to give you an energy boost and keep the shakes at bay.

Do have a drink and something to eat as soon as possible after your run. Drink plenty of water or a carbohydrate drink (ideally one which contains six grams of carbs per 100ml) to replenish fluid losses immediately after working out. Have a carbohydrate-rich snack with a little protein ideally within 30 minutes and no later than two hours perhaps a couple of portions of fresh fruit with a pot of yoghurt, a tuna or hummus sandwich or a carton of flavoured milk.

Do plan ahead. Ideally you should eat every three hours, so build your day around eating. Schedule meals and take nutritious snacks and shakes with you if you have to eat on the go.

Do choose low GI meals and foods, which will promote better glycogen storage. Carbs eaten with some protein or healthy fat (such as potatoes with chicken, pasta with fish or rice with tofu) give a longer, slower energy release compared with carbs on their own.

Don't eat less on rest days you still need plenty of carbs and protein to promote muscle recovery and re-fill glycogen stores.

Don't over-indulge. Although you need to take on a lot of calories when you're training hard, the energy in/energy out equation still applies. You risk gaining weight and sapping your performance if you overdo it.

Don't skip meals. Leaving longer than four hours between meals saps your energy and can result in muscle loss as your body turns to protein for fuel. No time for a meal? Have a smoothie or some nuts and dried fruit to stay fuelled.

Don't eat quick-fix foods. Fast foods, processed snacks and soft drinks are full of sugar, saturated fat and salt all great energy-sappers. They don't fill you up or satisfy your appetite so it's all too easy to passively over-consume calories.

Don't drink too much alcohol. It's high in calories, puts undue stress on the liver and can hinder your recovery after intense runs. If you must drink, limit yourself to one or two units (one pint of ordinary strength lager), and have at least two alcohol-free days per week.  (Ah well … can’t win them all!!)

(Many thanks to Runner’s World for the above http://www.runnersworld.co.uk )

 

Whilst on the subject of looking after yourself, a complementary site to the above is the “One-stop resource for runners” at http://www.runnersmedicalresource.com.  Taking part in long distance events can be beneficial to your health if you are aware of the correct ways of training, drinking and eating.  The website aims to deliver in simple terms, how to look after your body to ensure you have a safe and healthy race every time.

            

 

Events Diary: Most entry forms can be downloaded from race websites; others are likely to be on the club notice board.

 

Fri 06 Apr

MAIDENHEAD EASTER 10, 9:30am, Nortel, Westacott Way

10 miles

http://www.maidenheadac.co.uk

Sat 07 Apr

ASTHMA UK 10K, 11:00am Dorney Lake, Windsor

10k

http://www.asthma.org.uk

Mon 09 Apr

WEST WIGHT THREE HILLS 8, 12:00pm, Sports Ctre, Freshwater,

8 miles

http://www.rydeharriers.co.uk

Sun 15 Apr

HIGHWORTH 5 MILE, 11:00am Warneford School, Highworth

5 miles

http://www.highworthrunningclub.com

THAMES TOWPATH TEN, 9:30am, Chiswick, TW8 9PT

10 miles

http://www.west4harriers.org

TOUGH CHALLENGE - WENDOVER WOODS, 9:00am

26.2 miles

http://www.toughchallenge.com

Sun 22 Apr

THE LONDON MARATHON9:00 am Greenwich, London

26.2 miles

http://www.london-marathon.co.uk   

Sun 29 Apr

OFFA’S ORROR 20K, 10:30am, Anchor Inn, Tintern

20k

http://www.chepstowharriers.org.uk

BRACKNELL ½ MARATHON, 9:00am, South Hill Park

13.1 miles

http://www.bracknell-forest.gov.uk

MARWELL ZOO 10K, 10:30am, Colden Common, Near Winchester

10k

http://www.eastleighrunningclub.org.uk

Sun 06 May

THREE FORTS MARATHON, 10:00am, Worthing

26.2 miles

http://www.threefortsmarathon.org.uk

Mon 07May

SHINFIELD 10K, 10:30am,  Recreation Ground, Millworth Lane

10k

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/events/viewevent.asp?sp=&v=2&EN=35325

Tue 08 May

SILVERSTONE GRAND PRIX 10K, 7:30pm, Grand Prix Circuit

10k

http://www.silsonjoggers.org.uk

Sat 12 May

ICKNIELD WAY ½ MTH & 10K, 10:00am, Chinnor

13.1 miles

See club noticeboard

Sun 13 May

THE HAIRY LEGS CHALLENGE, 10:00am, Goring

5k,20k,5k

http://www.hairylegs.org

BENSON 10K & BUN RUN 4, 10:30am, Benson Parish Hall

10k

Benson, Oxfordshire

WOODLEY 10K, 11:00am Headley Road, Woodley

10k

http://www.woodley10K.co.uk

Sat 19 May

MARLBOROUGH DOWNS CHALLENGE, 9:00am & 10:30am

33 & 20 miles

http://www.marlboroughrunningclub.co.uk

Sun 20 May

THE WINDERMERE MARATHON 2007, Cumbria, Lake District

26.2 miles

http://www.brathay.org.uk 

OXFORD TOWN & GOWN 10K, 10:30am, University Parks, Parks Road

10k

http://oxfordtownandgown.org

PEWSEY VALE 10K, 11:00am Pewsey School, Wilcot Road

10k

http://www.pewseyvalerunningclub.com

Sun 27 May

ROPLEY 10K, 11:00am, starts from St Peter’s Church, in Church Street

10k

http://www.ropley10k.co.uk

Mon 28 May

KINTBURY 5, 10:30 Kintbury Village Hall

5 miles

www.newburyac.org.uk

Sun 03 Jun

THE CHILTERN CHASE, 10:00am Ewelme Village

10k

Entries;4 Wingfield Close, Ewelme, OX10 6JY

NEEDLES XC ½ & FULL MARATHON,10am West Wight

26.2 miles

http://needlesxcmarathon.blogspot.com

TRAIL RUN IN GLORIOUS GOODWOOD, 11:00am Country Park

10k

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/events/viewevent.asp?sp=&v=2&EN=36145

Sun 17 Jun

RIDGEWAY RELAY, 7:30am, Ivinghoe Beacon

87 miles

www.marlboroughrunningclub.co.uk

Sat 07 Jul

THE COMPTON CANTER, 2:00pm Compton recreation ground

~6 miles

http://www.comptonharriers.org.uk

Sun 15 Jul

CRAWLEY 10K (multi-terrain), 10:00am, K2 Leisure Centre, Crawley

10k

http://www.stch.org.uk

ST DOMINICS HAMBLEDON RUN, 10:30am, Godalming

6 miles

See club notice board

Sun 22 Jul

THAMES RUN, 11:30am Kinecroft, Wallingford

~13k

http://www.thamesrun.co.uk

Sun 16 Sep

THE BONESHAKER, 10:30am Ardington Sports Club

5k,20k,5k

www.bone-shaker.co.uk

Sun 21 Oct

ABINGDON MARATHON , 9:00am, Tilsley Park Athletics Stadium

26.2 miles

http://www.abingdonamblers.co.uk

Sun 28 Oct

BEACHY HEAD MARATHON,9.00am, St Bede's School,  Eastbourne

26.2 miles

http://www.beachyheadmarathon.org.uk

(Mo – April 2007)