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THE HARRIERS HERALD

No. 144, February 2005

  

Editorial

Welcome to February’s Harriers Herald.  Following the February and March Thursday night schedules, Lucy gives details for those who’d like to join her on Weekend Training Runs round the Compton Challenge route.  There is then a gentle reminder that Club Subscriptions are now due, and an update of correspondence received by the Secretary.  There are results and short reports for both the Goring & Woodcote Lions 10K and the fourth Handicap Race of the Winter Series.  Mo’s Website contribution this month covers different training sessions and a training pace calculator.  Last but not least, his recommended race Fixtures list takes us up to the middle of April and The London Marathon.

Sue

  

Thursday night schedule for February

Thurs    3rd                    Tom to lead

Thurs    10th                  Mo to lead

Thurs    17th                  Handicap Race

Thurs    24th                  Marie to lead

 

Thursday night schedule for March

Thurs    3rd                    Sue to lead

Thurs    10th                  Handicap Race

Thurs    17th                  ) Compton Challenge Route marking

Thurs    24th                  ) and collection of route markers?

Thurs    31st                  Martin to lead

  

Weekend Training Runs round Compton Challenge route

A message from Lucy:

 

If anyone would like to run part or all of the Compton 40 route I will be doing the 'double' - 20 miles each day - on the 12th and 13th of February.  Meet in the Institute car park at 1pm Saturday (for the first 20) and at 10 am Sunday (for the flatter, second 20).  I will plant a 2L, sealed water bottle at 7-mile intervals for rehydration.  Everyone is welcome, particularly if you know the route!

 

 

Subscription Reminder

A reminder that the 2005 subscription is now due.  Thanks to all who have paid up already.  For those who haven’t yet paid, but wish to remain a club member, please return your forms and payments to Lucy.  If you no longer wish to remain a member, please also let Lucy know.

  

Correspondence received by Secretary, January 2005

           

Abbreviations:  BCAA = Berkshire County Athletic Association; SEAA = South of England Athletic Association; AAA = Amateur Athletic Association of England; UKA = UK Athletics

 

Correspondence received

Sender

Subject matter

Action

Silson Joggers

Silverstone 10K entry forms

Notice-board

2:09 Events Ltd.

Longleat 10K entry forms

Notice-board

AAA

Hastings Half Marathon entry forms

Road Relay Champs (Women & Young Athletes)

AAA Champs & European Trials

Venues for England Athletics consultation meetings

Notice-board / file

National Soc. for Epilepsy

Running for this charity in London Marathon

Possible charity for Compton Downland Challenge?

BCAA

Wanted: Volunteer to manage Berks x-country team

File

BCAA

Subscription renewal and call for volunteer for BCAA Treasurer

Subscription renewal sent 31st Jan.

SEAA

Information Update #84; Preliminary notice of AGM; Athletics Development Update

File

Running Imp (via Simon)

Form to update our club / event information

Form returned 25th January

Race Director

Lochness Marathon / Festival of Running entry forms

Notice-board

  

Goring & Woodcote Lions 10K, 9th January

Sue

 

 Four Compton Harriers competed in this annual local event starting and finishing in Woodcote (though I’m afraid one traitor felt obliged to wear a Reading A.C. vest again!).  Mo and I were slightly caught out as, since we last took part in this race in 1999, it has been accurately measured and an extra quarter-mile added on to make it exactly 10K – oh well, a good excuse for a slower time!  Lucy took part in 2003, so the longer course was familiar to her.  Martin was taking part for the first time, so he was none the wiser.

 

The race started on time, and we had a kilometre of flat to establish our places, before heading on the long downhill stretch to Goring.  Being a local event, there were plenty of familiar faces around.  In front of me, I could see Reading A.C.’s Sam Aldridge (winner of the 2004 Compton 20 event) leading the field, with Reading’s John Burnett and Toby Laver, and Newbury’s Ian Coxhead also up there.  I caught Bob Taylor at 2K, but we could both only watch in envy as Martin made the most of the downhill and pulled further away from us.  Reading Roadrunner’s Belinda Davies passed us, and I knew I was then third lady.  Looking at my watch at 5K, I was on course for sub-37: if only the rest was downhill too……  The first uphill section from 5-6K wasn’t too bad, and then there was a nice downhill stretch.  The final 3K is mostly uphill and, although the weather was very pleasant, we were running into a breeze.  The official race photographer was located at the finish, so none of the on-line photos are particularly flattering!

 

Considering the wind and the terrain, we were all pretty pleased with our performances.  Martin was 8th overall and third veteran man (38:50), I was 21st, and 3rd lady (40:55), Lucy (93rd in 47:12) also made the top-ten in the ladies contingent, while Mo (249th in 60:08) had a further 70 competitors behind him.  The event went very smoothly and was very efficiently organized.  So efficient, in fact, that the presentation took place 15 minutes earlier than expected so Mo and I managed to miss it.  We finished with a well-earned drink at the pub opposite race HQ, and were still home in time for lunch.

 

Handicap Race (Village Lap)

Sue

 

 Illness and injury meant only five runners took part in January’s Handicap Race.  Although mild, there was a very strong wind from the west and south so Shepherd’s Mount, Burrell Road and Manor Crescent were hard work, and there were no fantastic times.  However, it was Pete who once again came closest to his predicted time to record a comfortable victory and retain the Handicap Trophy.  Although there were only five of us, we all finished within the space of 22 seconds, giving Jan a busy time.  My hopes of taking second place were dashed as Tom put in an amazing sprint as soon as he heard me coming, and I had to settle for third.  Lucy just managed to pass Yvonne to take fourth spot.  Well done to Pete and thanks again to Jan for timing.  February’s handicap race is scheduled for Thursday 17th.

 

After four races in the championship series, Dick remains the leader, although Pete and I have managed to reduce his lead to three points.

 

 

Pos

Name

Start time

Finish time

Actual time

Handicap Beaten?

1

Pete

2:15

16:02

13:47

+0:02

2

Tom

0:31

16:15

15:44

+0:15

3

Sue

4:20

16:16

11:56

+0:16

4

Lucy

2:18

16:22

14:04

+0:22

5

Yvonne

0:22

16:24

16:02

+0:24

 

 

Position

Name

Race points

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Total

1

Dick

7

7

6

-

-

-

20

2=

Sue

5

5

2

5

-

-

17

2=

Pete

-

3

7

7

-

-

17

4

Lucy

4

-

4

4

-

-

12

5=

Marie

-

6

5

-

-

-

11

5=

Tom

3

1

1

6

-

-

11

7=

Vicky

6

-

-

-

-

-

6

7=

Mo

1

2

3

-

-

-

6

9

Susanne

-

4

1

-

-

-

5

10

Yvonne

1

-

-

3

-

-

4

11

Martin

2

-

-

-

-

-

2


Website update… http://comptonharriers.cjb.net/

Mo

 

For this month, I thought I would try something a little different.  You may remember that I featured race pace and predicted time calculators in some of my recent links of the month.  Well, I have reproduced an article on training by kind permission of Runners World.  The article provides a guide for runners who aim to achieve and maintain peak performance.

Once you have read the article, you can click the link to the training pace calculator (if you are on line of course) or you can go on line later to calculate your training pace for a particular training session.

 

Training for Success

Train too hard and you'll probably burn out or get injured.  Train too gently and you simply won't make the most of your potential!  By studying the various training sessions below and then using the training pace calculator, you will be able to determine the correct pace at which to carry out each training session.

Easy runs

Top coaches and exercise physiologists believe that most runners should do 80 to 90 per cent of their weekly training at the easy run pace (this includes your long runs, done at approximately the same pace).  Easy runs build your aerobic fitness, and your muscular and skeletal strength.  They also help you burn more calories and recover for harder workouts.

Tempo runs

Tempo runs help you improve your running economy and your running form. They are sometimes described as 'threshold' or 'hard but controlled' runs, and they will help you prepare for races of 10K to the marathon. Tempo sessions generally fall into one of two categories: steady runs of 2 to 6 miles; or long intervals with short recoveries.  Here's an example of the latter: 4 x 1 mile at tempo run pace with 2 minutes of recovery jogging between efforts.  You should do tempo runs no more than once a week, and they should make up no more than 10 to 15 per cent of your total training.

VO2-max runs

VO2-max training helps you improve your running economy and your racing sharpness. These sessions are sometimes called 'intervals', and are most useful when you are preparing for a race of 5K to half-marathon. Here's an example of a good VO2-max workout: 6 x 800 metres at VO2-max pace with 4 to 6 minutes of recovery jogging between efforts.  You should do VO2-max workouts no more than once a week, and they should make up no more than 6 to 10 per cent of your total training.  (When you run these workouts, you are running at or near 100 per cent of your maximum oxygen capacity, which scientists call VO2-max.)

Speed-form runs

Speed-form workouts help you improve your running economy, form and leg speed.  These are also interval sessions tailored to help you prepare for races of 800 metres to 5K.  Here's an example of a good speed-form workout: 8 x 400 metres at speed-form pace with 3 to 4 minutes of recovery jogging between efforts.  You should do speed-form sessions no more than once a week and they should make up no more than 4 to 8 per cent of your total training.

Yasso 800s

Yasso 800s are an invention of Runner's World US writer Bart Yasso, who has run more than 50 marathons and ultramarathons.  They're simple: if you want to run a marathon in 2:45, 3:29 or 4:11, you should train to the point where you can run 10 repetitions of 800 metres in the same time: 2:45, 3:29 or 4:11. The only difference is that your marathon time is hours:minutes and your 800 time is minutes:seconds.  Bart suggests doing Yasso 800s once a week as part of your marathon training.  Start with perhaps 4 x 800 and build up to 10 x 800.  Between the 800s, take a recovery jog that lasts as long as your 800s.  A good Yasso 800 workout: 6 x 800m at Yasso pace with recovery jogs between the 800s.

Long runs

Long runs form the foundation of all marathon-training programs and build everything from your confidence to your discipline to your fat-burning.  So, even when you're not training for a specific marathon, it's a good idea to do at least one semi-long run a week.  Because long runs are done at a relaxed pace, there's great latitude in how fast you actually run.  In general, we believe that slower is better than faster.  Let your long runs be your slow runs, and save your legs for other days of the week when you might do tempo runs or maximum-oxygen runs.  But there are a thousand theories about how to do long runs, none of which have yet been proven superior to the others.  The important thing is building up the distance and training your body to keep going for 3, 4, 5 or however many hours it's going to take you.

 

Summary

Don't overdo your training!

 

Hard days

Most beginner and intermediate runners should do no more than two hard days a week.  More advanced runners can do three hard days if they're careful.  Each of the following is a hard-day workout: tempo runs, VO2-max sessions, speed-form workouts, Yasso 800s, long runs.

Hard days/Easy days

A hard session should usually be followed by one or (even better) two easy day sessions.  Easy days can include rest days and cross-training days.

Rest days

Most beginner and intermediate runners should run no more than 4 to 6 days a week.  You should take one or two rest days, when you do no training at all (or just take a relaxed 30-minute walk) and one or two cross-training days.

Cross-training days

The world of cross-training has expanded dramatically in recent years.  While research indicates that cross-training probably won't make you a faster runner, it can make you a stronger and healthier and less injury-prone runner.  Runners do best with cross-training exercises that are non-weight-bearing.  This includes swimming and aqua-running, strength-training, bicycling and rowing.  Other non-impact exercises include Nordic skiing, elliptical training and step climbing.

 

When online, click here for the training pace calculator.

 

Next month, I will include race time predictor and race time calculator tables.

 

Fixtures: A selection of local and other well known events for your information:-

 

·   Sunday 6th February 2005 - OXFORD MAIL X-COUNTRY LEAGUE – Cirencester

   Ladies Start time: 11.0 a.m.; Men’s Start time: 11.45 a.m.  http://www.geocities.com/oxmailxc

 

·   Sunday 13th February 2005 - 10am start - WOKINGHAM HALF MARATHON Cantley Park     www.wokinghamhalfmarathon.co.uk

 

·   Sunday 20th February 200510:30am start – THE DURSLEY DOZEN – Dursley, Gloucester http://www.g4cio.demon.co.uk/ddozen/ddozen.htm

 

·    Sunday 20th February 200510:00am start – BEACON HILL 3M RACE Beacon Hill, Newbury

    Organised by Team Kennet (Contact Nick Bull).

 

·   Sunday 20th February 200510:30am start – BRAMLEY 10+20 MILE - Bramley Primary School  

   www.readingroadrunners.org

 

·   Sunday 27th February 200511:00am start – THE GORING 10K – Goring-on-Thames   http://www.goring10k.com

 

·   Sunday 27th  February 2005 - at 10:30 am - THE TERMINATOR (10-ISH MILE MT) – Pewsey, Wilts

 

·   Sunday 6th March 2005 - OXFORD MAIL X-COUNTRY LEAGUE – Shotover, Horspath

   Ladies Start time: 11.00 a.m.; Men’s Start time: 11.45 a.m.  http://www.geocities.com/oxmailxc

 

·   Sunday 13th March 2005 – THE GRIZZLY – Seaton, Devon  http://www.axevalleyrunners.org.uk

 

·   Saturday 19th March 2005 COMPTON DOWNLAND CHALLENGE 40 – 0900hrs Downs School  Compton http://comptonharriers.cjb.net

 

·   Sunday 20th March 2005COMBE GIBBET TO OVERTON 16 – 1400hrs http://www.overtonharriers.org.uk

 

·   Sunday 3rd April 2005WHITE HORSE HALF MARATHON – 1000hrs Millbrook School, Grove http://www.whitehorseharriers.homestead.com

 

·   Sunday 17th April 2005THE FLORA LONDON MARATHON – 0945hrs Blackheath, London http://www.london-marathon.co.uk

 

 

 (Mo - Feb 2005)